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In 1967, the painter Emilio Vedova worked on an installation for the Italian Pavilion of the Montreal Expo. Vedova came up with thie idea of using small glass slides, especially created to reproduce his abstract painting, and then projected on the asymmetrical walls of the Pavilion. He asked Luigi Nono to compose some electronic music, but Nono suggested Marino Zuccheri. The result is Parete (Wall) 67, a spectacular and intense 30-minutes loop of pure and intense electronics, a magmatic cascade of harsh sounds and deep drones, and a fantastic counterpart to Vedova's harsh and expressionistic painting.

Marino Zuccheri was the sound engineer of the famous Milan RAI (Italian Broadcasting Company) Electronic Music Studio, and he helped Berio, Nono, Maderna, Cage, Pousseur among the others, to give birth to some of the great masterpieces of early electronics. He was the man who actually knew and operated the machines (oscillators, tapes etc). That's why Umberto Eco (the philosopher and world famous writer - i.e. The Name of the Rose - who worked at RAI and especially with Berio on "Thema-Omaggio a Joyce") wrote about Zuccheri:

«Who is one of the most performed contemporary electronic composer in the world? Marino Zuccheri, the sound engineer of the RAI Studio of Fonologia in Milan. Illustrious figures in the history of contemporary music arrived there with State grants; but after many months, they still couldn’t figure out how to handle the machines. Then Marino (who, working with Berio and Maderna, had become a wizard), started mixing tapes and producing electronic sounds: that is why some of the compositions now being performed all over the world are by Marino Zuccheri.» (Umberto Eco)

Marino Zuccheri: Parete 67

Parete (Excerpt 1) Marino Zuccheri
Parete (Excerpt 2) Marino Zuccheri
Parete (Excerpt 3) Marino Zuccheri
Parete (Excerpt 4) Marino Zuccheri

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